Tags

Speed metal

Speed metal is a sub-genre of heavy metal music originating in the late 1970’s to mid 1980’s that was the direct musical progenitor of power metal and thrash metal. Speed metal is characterized by staccato drumming, single-note riffing at fast tempos and complex guitar solos. Unlike thrash metal, speed metal uses melodical hooks

Stoner rock

Stoner Rock and stoner metal are terms describing sub-genres of rock and metal music. They are typically slow-to-mid tempo, low-tuned, and bass-heavy, incorporating elements of traditional heavy metal. psychedelic rock, blues-rock and doom metal into a more repetitive and riff-centred style. Other common traits include melodic vocals and ‘retro’ production

Swedish


Swing

Swing music, also known as swing jazz, is a form of jazz music that developed in the early 1930s and had solidified as a distinctive style by 1935 in the United States. Swing uses a strong anchoring rhythm section which supports a lead section that can include brass instruments, including trumpets and trombones, woodwinds including saxophones and clarinets or stringed instruments including violin and guitar; medium to fast tempos; and a “lilting” swing time rhythm

Symphonic metal

Symphonic metal is a term used to describe heavy metal music that has symphonic elements; that is, elements that sound similar to a classical symphony. Symphonic metal is both a genre of metal and a name given to several subgenres of other metal genres, and as such, both forms of usage have slightly varying definitions

Synth pop

Synth Pop is a type of pop music in which the synthesizer is the dominant instrument. In the 80s it was associated with the new wave scene. Kraftwerk and Yellow Magic Orchestra are often hailed as the pioneers of the style.

Synthpop

Synthpop is a type of pop music in which the synthesizer is the dominant instrument. In the 80s it was associated with the new wave scene. Kraftwerk (from Germany) and Yellow Magic Orchestra (from Japan) are often hailed as the pioneers of the style.

Technical death metal

Technical death metal (sometimes called tech-death or progressive death metal) is a musical subgenre of death metal that focuses on complex rhythms, riffs and song structures.Technical experimentation in death metal began in the late ’80s and early ’90s by bands such as Death, Atheist and Cynic. In 1990, Nocturnus released their debut album, The Key, which was followed by Sarcófago’s third album, The Laws of Scourge, featuring a change in their musical style, black metal/thrash metal to technical death metal

Techno

Techno music is a type of electronic and dance music. It emphasizes rhythm and utilizes advancements in music technology and production. It is a mainly instrumental genre, usually reliant on DJ mixes. Techno was developed in and around Detroit, Michigan in the 1980s, and utilizes a myriad of synthesizers, drum machines, multi-tracking, and hardware sequencers

Thrash


Thrash metal

Thrash metal (sometimes referred to simply as thrash) is a subgenre of heavy metal music, one of the extreme metal subgenres that is characterised by high speed riffing and aggression. Thrash metal songs typically use fast, percussive and low-register guitar riffs, overlaid with shredding-style lead work

Trance

Trance is a style of electronic dance music that developed in the 1980s. Trance music is generally characterized by a tempo of between 130 and 160 BPM, featuring repeating melodic synthesizer phrases, and a musical form that builds up and down throughout a track. It often features crescendos and breakdowns

Trip hop

Trip hop is a music genre also known as the Bristol sound or Bristol acid rap. The trip hop description was applied to the musical trend in the mid-1990s of downtempo electronic music that grew out of England’s hip hop and house scenes. It is often rejected as a term by those artists to whom it is applied

Trip-hop

A “type of dance music, played on electronic instruments and with a slow beat”, according to Longman Dictionary, trip-hop (also known in the past as the “Bristol sound”) is, in fact, a musical movement that started in Bristol, UK. The tag isn’t limited to Bristol-based bands though; bands as far as Canada (eg

Uk

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (commonly known as the United Kingdom, the UK, or Britain) is a sovereign state located off the northwestern coast of continental Europe. It is an island country, spanning Great Britain, the northeast part of Ireland, and many small islands.

Underground hip-hop

Hip hop outside major labels. May or may not be conscious.

See also definitions of revolutionary hip-hopconscious hip-hopanarchist hip-hopanti-authoritarian hip-hop

Usa

The United States of America (commonly referred to as the United States, the U.S., the USA, or America) is a federal constitutional republic comprising fifty states and a federal district. The country is situated mostly in central North America, where its forty-eight contiguous states and Washington, D.C., the capital district, lie between the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, bordered by Canada to the north and Mexico to the south

Viking metal

Viking metal is a subgenre of black metal characterized by its chaotic and noisy sound, slow pace, use of keyboards, dark and violent imagery, and, primarily, lyrical themes of Norse mythology, Norse paganism, and the Viking Age. A lot of people mistake Viking metal for any metal with lyrical themes about Viking or Finno-Ugric mythology, heathenism etc

Visual kei

Visual Kei (ヴィジュアル系) refers to a movement among Japanese musicians,

that is characterized by the use of eccentric, sometimes flamboyant looks.

This usually involves striking make-up, unusual hair styles and elaborate costumes,

often, but not always, coupled with androgynous aesthetics

Vocal trance

Vocal trance is a subgenre of trance music developed in Germany. It contains vocals, highly melodic sessions, intro/outros which are similar to those of hard trance or progressive trance and tracks of usually about 6 to 8 minutes long. The sub-genre goes back to the early 1990s, when trance was still developing, and vocals have gone onto become a staple of trance

World

“World” (or “World Music”) is a controversial classification often used in music marketing to easily discriminate different music from the anglophone genres (and even traditional anglophone Folk genres from more popular styles such as Rock, Pop, Jazz and Electronic music).

The term can thus encompass all the music ever created, from traditional African drumming and the extended qawwali singing of Pakistan’s Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan through to rock’n’roll from Italy or Brazil

World music

The term “World Music” has been credited to ethnomusicologist Robert E. Brown who coined it in the 1960s. The term became current in the 1980s as a marketing/classificatory device in the media and the music industry, and it is generally used in a discriminatory and problematic fashion to classify any kind of non-Western music, even including some Western styles such as Celtic Folk music.

A basic actual definition of world music consists of “all the music in the world”, which effectively renders the term virtually meaningless beyond marketing purposes